New DOL Ruling Increases the Salary Threshold for Exempt Employees

club-2492011_1920This morning the Department of Labor (DOL) announced the new salary threshold for exempt employees. Currently employees who meet certain job duties tests and are paid on a salary basis equal to at least $455 per week can be considered exempt from overtime. The new ruling increases the salary threshold from $455 per week to $684 per week. This new threshold is effective January 1, 2020.

The new threshold means that employers who have exempt employees making less than $684 need to either reclassify the employees as non-exempt (making them eligible for overtime pay when working more than 40 hours in a workweek ) or need to increase wages to be above the weekly minimum. Continue reading

New Salary Threshold for Exempt Employees

Update September 24, 2019 – The DOL has announced a new minimum salary threshold effective January 1, 2020. The new minimum threshold is $684 per week. An updated post regarding this new threshold is available here: New DOL Ruling Increases the Salary Threshold for Exempt Employees

UPDATE: November 22, 2016 – A federal judge has delayed the new overtime rule. At this time it is not known how long the rule will be delayed or if the new rule will be enforced at all in the future.  The minimum salary threshold for exempt employees will remain at $455 per week until further notice.

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The Department of Labor (DOL) has issued the much anticipated final rules regarding overtime for salary employees.

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the minimum pay for exempt employees is currently $455 per week (or $23,660 per year). Under the new rule, effective December 1, 2016, the minimum pay will increase to $913 per week (or $47,476 per year). The salary threshold will automatically be updated every three years, beginning on January 1, 2020, based on average wage growth.

An added provision of the new rule is the ability for employers to include nondiscretionary bonuses and incentive payments, including commissions, up to 10 percent of gross wages, to meet the minimum salary requirements. For example, if an employee is paid $44,000 base salary and receives a bonus of $4,000 per year (less than 10% of their gross annual salary), they could still be considered exempt under the new rule because their total compensation ($48,000) is higher than the new salary threshold.

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New Proposed Overtime Rule Released by the Department of Labor

clock-334117_1280The Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor (DOL) has recently released proposed changes to the salary threshold for overtime exemption.  Under the current Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), in order for an employee to be considered “exempt” (meaning they are not required to be paid overtime for working more than 40 hours per week) the employee must be paid a salary of at least $455 per week.  The new proposed rule would increase this salary figure to approximately $970 per week, or $50,440 per year. The new figure was set at the 40th percentile of current exempt salary employees.  The proposed rule also states that the salary threshold would be adjusted annually based on the 40th percentile of wages paid each year.

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