Making the Most of the First 90 Days of a New Hire

Filling open positions in your company is a demanding job, requiring a grefile551263252097at deal of time to research and create the job description, recruit and screen candidates, and put together an attractive offer for the best person for the job.

The hard work isn’t over when that great candidate says “yes.” A new employee’s first 90 days on the job are a crucial time for learning, acclimating and determining if there’s a good fit between the person and the position. Fortunately, there’s a lot your business can do to take full advantage of this important period of time. Continue reading

Probationary Periods Don’t Protect You From Unemployment Liability

XDMB0IC7TXWe’ve heard a number of managers refer to probationary periods and make statements such as “we can terminate them within the first 90 days of employment because they’re in a probationary period.”  Even in an at will employment relationship (for the states which recognize at will employment), termination during a probationary period could still result in potential liability for your company in the event of an unemployment claim or other lawsuit (discrimination, harassment, etc).

Whether an employee has worked for your company for 1 day or 10 years, there is still potential liability.  For example, in Michigan, the wages for the last five quarters at all jobs the employee has worked are used when determining benefit eligibility.  So even if the person was only employed by your company for two weeks or two days, they could still be eligible for benefits if their wages from all employers in the last five quarters meet the minimum threshold.

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MYTH: Fire an Employee During Probationary Period to Avoid Unemployment Liability

A common assumption among employers is that having a probationary period at the beginning of employment provides a safe-guard in terms of unemployment.  For example, a company might have a 90 day probationary period for all new hires.  A manager’s assumption is that they can terminate an employee during that 90 day window and the employee would be disqualified from receiving unemployment benefits because they are still a “probationary” employee.

This is not the case.

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