Paid Leave Soon to be the Law in Nevada January 2020

Following suit with other states, Nevada will soon require employers with 50 or more employees to provide general paid leave to all employees. This include full-time and part-time employees, but excludes temporary, on-call, and seasonal employees.

Effective January 1st, 2020, employers must provide “at least 0.01923 hours of paid leave per hour of work performed.” This means that an employee who works 40 hours a week for a whole year will accrue 40 hours of paid leave. This paid leave can be used for any reason, in fact your employee does not have to give you a reason. Still, employees must give a “reasonable” amount of notice before using their paid leave. Continue reading

Michigan Employers: New Paid Sick Leave Law

Update (1/5/2019):

The Michigan paid sick leave act has been signed into law, and with that several amendments were made.

* The law will go into effect on March 29th, 2019.

* Only employers with 50 or more employees will be required to participate.

* Regardless of participation, all employers in Michigan are required to post the Michigan Paid Sick Leave labor law poster in their places of business.

* There will be exemptions for several types of employees, including, but not limited to overtime exempt employees, temporary employees, and employees who are already covered under a collective bargaining agreement.

* Previously the act stated that each employee would need to accrue 1 hour paid sick leave per every 30 hours worked, due to the amendments this has been updated to 1 hour for every 35 hours worked.

* The original amount of paid sick leave an employer would have been required to allow was 72 hours per benefit year, this has been reduced to 40 hours. The same numbers were adjusted for the required carry over amount.

Michigan has recently joined other states in passing legislature that would require employers to provide paid sick leave to all employees beginning in March 2019.

The paid sick leave law and the new minimum wage law (read more about that here!) were passed with the intention of amending them after the general election in November 2018.  Both were to appear on the ballot this November but now will not as they have already been signed into law. By passing them as laws prior to the hammer-485712_1920election, Congress is now only required a majority vote to amend the laws rather than a vote of three fourths if the initiatives had been passed on the ballots in November.

As the law stands in September 2018 (subject to any future amendments), all employers in Michigan would be required to provide paid sick leave to all employees (full time, part time, temporary, etc). Employees must accrue 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours of work performed. Continue reading

Georgia’s New Kin Care Law

Effective July 1, 2017, large employers in Georgia who offer sick leave to their employees must allow their employees to use sick time to care for an immediate family member.

The new law applies to employers with 25 or more employees. These large employers who currently offer employees paid sick leave (or begin to do so in the future) must allow employees who work at least 30 hours per week to use up to 5 days of paid sick leave per year for the care of an immediate family member. Continue reading

Arizona Employers to be Required to Provide Paid Sick Time to All Employees

Under the Fair Wages and Health Families Act, all Arizona employers will be required to provide their employees with paid sick leave beginning on July 1, 2017.

All employees (including full time, part time and temporary) should begin accruing a minimum of one hour of earned paid sick time for each 30 hours worked.

Employers with 15 or more employees can impose an accrual limit of 40 hours (or more) each year. This means that employees would stop accruing paid sick time after they had accrued a total of 40 hours per year.

Continue reading

Paid Sick Leave Required for Chicago Employers

Effective July 1, 2017 employers with one or more employee working in Chicago will be required to provide their “covered” employees with paid sick leave.

The new ordinance applies to all businesses with one or more “covered” employee in Chicago who have a business facility within the city or who are subject to any of Chicago’s license requirements.

Employees are covered by the ordinance if they work at least two hours in Chicago in any two-week period. Both part time and full time employees are covered as long as they work at least 80 hours in any 120-day period.

Continue reading

San Francisco: Updated Paid Sick Leave Effective January 1, 2017

San Francisco is ugolden-gate-bridge-388917_1920pdating their paid sick leave law, first enacted in 2007. The new changes will go into effect on January 1, 2017. Prior to January 1, 2017, employers should continue to follow the existing paid sick leave ordinance (click here to read the original ordinance). As a brief overview, the current law requires all employers to provide paid sick leave to all employees, including part time and temporary employees, who work in San Francisco. This leave can be used for an employee’s illness, injury or to receive medical treatment or to assist a family member or other designated person who is ill, injured or receiving medical treatment.

Employees in San Francisco currently begin accruing sick leave after 90 days of employment and can accrue up to 72 hours of paid sick leave. Employers with less than ten employees (including full time, part time and temporary employees), have a reduced maximum accrual of 40 hours of paid sick leave. Continue reading

Los Angeles: New Paid Sick Leave Ordinance

On June 2, 2016 the City of Los Angeles approved a city sick leave ordinance separate from the required California state sick leave requirements. This new city ordinance goes into effect on July 1, 2016.

Employees who work two or more hours in a week in the city of Los Angeles will accrue up to 48 hours of sick leave per year. Ttime-371226_1280his is double the amount required by California state law (24 hours).

This new rule applies to employers of all sizes with employees working in Los Angeles. There is not a lower cap for small employers like there is for San Francisco or Santa Monica small employers. Continue reading