Form I-9 – What Is It and How Do I Complete It?

Federal Law stipulates that employers only hire individuals who can legally work in the United States, either U.S. citizens or foreign citizens who have the required authorization. To act in accordance with the law, all employers must complete and preserve Form I-9 (Employment Eligibility Verification) to document verification of the identity and employment authorization of all new employees, citizens and noncitizens, to work in the United States.

Employees and employers (or authorized representatives of the employer) must complete the form. The employee must complete Section 1, which they must confirm to their employment authorization. The employee must also present their employer with suitable documents providing identity and employment authorization. The employer must examine the employment eligibility and identity document(s) the employee presents to determine if the document(s) appear to be authentic and relate to the employee and record the document information in Section 2.

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Making the Most of the First 90 Days of a New Hire

Filling open positions in your company is a demanding job, requiring a grefile551263252097at deal of time to research and create the job description, recruit and screen candidates, and put together an attractive offer for the best person for the job.

The hard work isn’t over when that great candidate says “yes.” A new employee’s first 90 days on the job are a crucial time for learning, acclimating and determining if there’s a good fit between the person and the position. Fortunately, there’s a lot your business can do to take full advantage of this important period of time. Continue reading

The Employer’s Role in Documenting Workers Eligibility to Work (Form I-9)

pen-543858_1280The employer’s role in documenting alien workers is a balancing act.

Under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA), you must verify through examination of certain documents that employees are authorized to work in the U.S.  At the same time, you must avoid unfair employment practices.

By law, you must complete an I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification form for each new hire and keep the forms on file.  Former employees’ forms must be kept for three years from the hiring date or one year after termination, whichever is later.

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Reporting New Hires to the Government

When a business hires employees, it must generally report certain details about the new staff members to a state agency within a short period of time.

The agency compares the information with child support files in that state, and then passes it on to the National Directory of New Hires (NDNH), where it is compared with child support files from other states.

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