Illinois Artificial Intelligence Video Interview Act Effective January 1, 2020

Artificial intelligence (AI) is becoming more and more prevalent in workplaces today and is changing the way we hire. Illinois is the first state to create regulations around using AI for video interviewing and its law becomes effective January 1st, 2020.   Continue reading

Paid Leave Soon to be the Law in Nevada January 2020

Following suit with other states, Nevada will soon require employers with 50 or more employees to provide general paid leave to all employees. This include full-time and part-time employees, but excludes temporary, on-call, and seasonal employees.

Effective January 1st, 2020, employers must provide “at least 0.01923 hours of paid leave per hour of work performed.” This means that an employee who works 40 hours a week for a whole year will accrue 40 hours of paid leave. This paid leave can be used for any reason, in fact your employee does not have to give you a reason. Still, employees must give a “reasonable” amount of notice before using their paid leave. Continue reading

New Hire Reporting May Be Required for Your Independent Contractors

Most employers are aware of the federal law requiring you to report all of your newly hired employees (and rehired employees) to your state within a specified time period, but were you aware that you may also be required to report new independent contractors that begin working for you to your state as well?

New hire reporting is mandated at the federal level by The Personal Responsibility apaperclip-178126_1920nd Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), but specific details as to the requirements of the new hire reporting vary from state to state.  States determine how the new hire reporting information should be submitted, in what format, in what amount of time (maximum of 20 days from date of hire per federal law), and who should be reported. The “who” includes independent contractors for many states such as California. Continue reading

California Bill Would Significantly Change the Definition of an Employee

California businesses who rely on “gig workers” to perform the work for the company may soon need to restructure their business model based on a new bill that has been passed by Congress in California and is expected to be signed soon by Governor Gavin Newsom. This new bill would require that companies using these “gig workers” (the two biggest companies being Uber and Lyft) reclassify their workers to be considered employees rather than continue to be classified as independent contractors.  

It’s important to note that this would only apply to California workers. The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled earlier this year that Uber drivers (and similar workers) were independent contractors because they used their own equipment, set their own schedules, could work for competitors, and were responsible for their own profit and/or loss. Continue reading

Minimum Wage to Increase for Michigan Employees

The state of Michigan has recently passed a law that will gradually increase the minimum wage for non-exempt employees to $12.00 per hour by January 1, 2022.  The state minimum wage applies to all Michigan employers with two or more employees who are 16 years of age or older.

In the past, Michigan has allowed employers to pay tipped employees 38% of the minimum wage, but that percentage will gradually increase to 80% of the minimum wage by January 1, 2022.  Continue reading

Employee Paid Time Off Donation Program

Let’s discuss a situation that’s somewhat common among employers.  You have an employee, Sharon, who has used all of her allowed paid time off (vacation, personal, sick, etc.) for the year. Sharon’s mother falls ill with a serious medical condition and Sharon needs to take additional time off work to help care for her mother, but she doesn’t have any paid time off available. Sharon’s coworker, Kim, has a lot of accrued paid time off with no vacation plans so she asks you if she can donate some of her available paid time off balance to Sharon to be able to use during her absence so that Sharon doesn’t have to take unpaid time off work to care for her mother. Can you allow Kim to donate her paid time off to Sharon?

You can. But it’s not that simple.

Continue reading

Handling the Death of an Employee

While nobody wants to think about tragic situations such as the death of an employee, it’s best to have a list of items to take care of should one of your employees pass away. Having a plan of action in place will help you stay organized and ensure all necessary items are addressed properly.

Prior to the death of an employee, and on an at least annual basis, it is recommended that you have employees review and update personnel forms.  These forms include emergency contacts, their life insurance and 401k forms, and health medical savings accounts.  There are many life events that can occur throughout your employees’ time with your company that can affect how their end of life benefits are administered (when applicable) such as separation, divorce, or death within their family resulting in a change of beneficiary information. Continue reading