Encourage Your Employees to Take Breaks

Many states require that employees are allowed breaks for rest and/or meal periods (see our previous blog post here for information on your state’s requirements, if any).  But even for employers in states with no requirements, there are many reasons you should encourage your employees to take regular breaks.

While taking breaks may seem counterproductive when you want your employees to be as productive as possible during their work time, there are actually several benefits, both for the employee and the employer, when employees take breaks.

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3 Common Myths Concerning Exempt and Salary Employees

With the new minimum salary threshold for exempt employees taking place later this year (Read more about that here), employers should concentrate on mausdol_seal_circa_2015_svgking sure they are in compliance with the new rules and also confirm that their exempt employees are correctly classified.  In addition, employers should make sure they fully understand how exempt employees should be paid.

To help employers with understanding payment of exempt employees, we’re debunking three common myths associated with exempt and salary employees.

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Collaborative Goal-Setting Drives Performance

startup-593343_1280All too often, the process of establishing goals for employees in the context of a performance evaluation slides into an uninspired exercise of just going through the motions, only to provide an easy reference point for future compensation decisions.  But it can instead be an opportunity to inspire your staff to high levels of productivity and achievement.  Accomplishing that can only happen if you take the process seriously, and move beyond some entrenched myths about setting performance goals.

Here’s how you can do it.

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Employee or Independent Contractor? Two Tax Court Cases

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Does your firm use outside workers for some jobs?  This can result in significant tax breaks if the workers are properly classified as independent contractors rather than employees.

Key point: If a worker is an employee, your company must withhold federal income tax and employment taxes from his or her wages.  In addition, your business is responsible for paying the employer’s share of federal payroll taxes.  Conversely, if a worker is characterized as an independent contractor, your company isn’t liable for these payroll tax obligations.

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