Families First Coronavirus Response Act

On March 18, 2020 the federal government signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic. There are several parts to this law including 

  1. A new requirement for employers with between 1 and 500 employees to provide emergency paid sick leave to employees under certain situations,  
  1. An extension of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA),  
  1. Tax credits for small businesses to reimburse employers for wages paid under the new emergency paid sick leave and FMLA extension, and  
  1. A requirement for health insurance providers to provide testing for COVID-19 at no cost to individuals needing testing.  

This new law is to take effect within 15 days of enactment (April 2, 2020). It’s important to note that since this law passed through Congress so quickly there are a number of items still awaiting further guidance or regulations from government agencies. All parts of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act are currently set to expire on December 31, 2020.    Continue reading

Preparing Your Workplace for the Coronavirus

The recent Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak around the world has been in the news often the last few months, especially more recently since multiple people in the United States have now been diagnosed with the virus.  As an employer, there are a few things that you can do to protect your workforce and help prevent the spread of the virus in the event your employees are diagnosed, or exposed to someone who has been diagnosed, with the virus: Continue reading

Joint-Employer Relationships: US Department of Labor Final Ruling

The U.S. Department of Labor has released a final ruling on what constitutes a joint employer relationship when it comes to liability for wage and hour matters. In a wage and hour investigation, a four-factor balancing test will be used by courts to determine whether two entities are considered joint employers. The four-factor test will assess whether the company: Continue reading

Preparing for Payroll in 2020

As 2019 winds down there are a number of things that you need to be aware of going in to 2020 to ensure compliance with federal and state wage and hour rules and other payroll related laws. Continue reading

IRS Releases Revamped 2020 W-4 Form

For the first time in many years the IRS has significantly revamped the Federal W-4 form for 2020.  This new form will be required to be completed by all new employees beginning on January 1, 2020. Any existing employees who wish to make changes to their federal tax withholding after January 1st will also need to use the new version. Employers can ask, but cannot require, all existing employees to submit a new version of the W-4 form. However, if an employee hired before January 1, 2020 does not complete a 2020 W-4 employers must use the last completed W-4 to calculate appropriate federal withholding for the employee. Continue reading

Illinois Artificial Intelligence Video Interview Act Effective January 1, 2020

Artificial intelligence (AI) is becoming more and more prevalent in workplaces today and is changing the way we hire. Illinois is the first state to create regulations around using AI for video interviewing and its law becomes effective January 1st, 2020.   Continue reading

Daylight Savings Time and Wage and Hour Compliance

For employees working the graveyard shift, this weekend could be a bit longer than normal. With the exception of Arizona and Hawaii, Daylight Savings Time ends this Sunday, November 3rd at 2 AM local time for all U.S. states. At this time, thetime-371226_1280 clocks will roll back to 1 AM and repeat the hour. If you have employees that work at that time, your payroll liability will likely be higher than on a typical work day because of the additional hour worked unless scheduling modifications are made. Continue reading