Improve Your Interview Procedures and Get Results

Have you ever asked these questions during a job interview?

Q. What do you want to be doing five years from now-Q. How would you handle a situation where an employee needed discipline-Q. What do you consider your strengths and weaknesses-

Big mistake! Questions like these can inspire creative applicants to tell you what they think you want to hear in order to try and impress you.

Another mistake is asking theoretical questions. You’ll get theoretical answers and possibly learn a lot about the prospective employee’s dreams and fantasies. Or you might learn nothing at all.

A better approach is to ask for specifics to elicit responses that tell you what the applicant has done — rather than what he or she intends to do.

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Making the Most of the First 90 Days of a New Hire

Filling open positions in your company is a demanding job, requiring a grefile551263252097at deal of time to research and create the job description, recruit and screen candidates, and put together an attractive offer for the best person for the job.

The hard work isn’t over when that great candidate says “yes.” A new employee’s first 90 days on the job are a crucial time for learning, acclimating and determining if there’s a good fit between the person and the position. Fortunately, there’s a lot your business can do to take full advantage of this important period of time. Continue reading

Workplace Retaliation: Reduce the Chances of a Claim

In order to prevent illegal retaliation from occurring in your workplace, you Push Pinshave to understand some basic definitions.

  • Retaliation occurs when an employer takes an adverse action against a covered individual because he or she engaged in a protected activity.
  • An adverse action is taken to keep someone from opposing a discriminatory or harassing practice or participating in an employment discrimination proceeding. Examples of adverse actions include terminating an employee, denying a promotion and giving an unjustified negative performance evaluation.
  • For purposes of federal employment laws administered by the EEOC, covered individuals are people who have opposed unlawful practices, participated in proceedings, or requested accommodations related to employment discrimination based on race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, or disability. Individuals who have a close association with someone who has engaged in protected activity are also covered. For example, it is illegal to terminate an employee because his spouse (who is also an employee) participated in employment discrimination litigation.
  • Note: In addition to the employment laws administered by the EEOC, retaliation can occur against individuals who may be protected by other federal, state, or local laws. This includes the federal Family Medical Leave Act and whistleblower laws that bring attention to ethical, financial, or other concerns.
  • Protected activity includes opposing a practice believed to be unlawful discrimination. For example, an employee complaining about treatment he or she believes is discriminatory — directed at the employee or a co-worker. Protected activity also includes participating in an employment discrimination proceeding or requesting a reasonable accommodation based on religion or disability.

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