How Some Employment Actions Illegally Discriminate

You hired a disabled veteran. You’re giving extra time-off to an employee who needs chemotherapy.file6831274905127 You feel you’re doing everything you can to make “reasonable accommodations” for your employees protected under the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and similar state laws.

You may need to examine more than your hiring practices and benefits. Look at your everyday actions and the everyday actions of your managers and supervisors. Discrimination against the disabled can be subtle and unintentional. Continue reading

What if an Employee is Injured Too Often?

I have a fairly good 48-year old employee who has a chronic problem with Workers’ Comp claims. This individual is constantly getting injured and missing a lot of work because of these injuries. I am afraid he is building up to a permanent disability claim.  Can I legally terminate him?aide-161214_1280

Dismissing an employee for filing Workers’ Comp claims is a violation of public policy.

Courts have established and upheld state statutes protecting employees from being dismissed from their jobs for filing Workers’ Comp claims. In addition, your employee may very well be protected from discrimination by the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and similar state laws.

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What Happens If There is a Breakdown of COBRA Compliance?

At some companies, there may not be a well established system in place for handling the tasks necessary to comply with COBRA. Here’s a brief overview of COBRA as well as a question from a concerned employer about the implications of not complying, along with a detailed answer.

COBRA Basics
The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) gives eligible workers and their families who lose their health benefits the right to choose to continue group health benefits for limited periods of time under certain circumstances. The life events that enable an individual to become eligible for COBRA include voluntary or involuntary job loss, reduction in the hours worked, transition between jobs, death and divorce. Qualified individuals may be required to pay the entire premium for coverage up to 102 percent of the cost to the plan. — The U.S. Department of Labor

Question: Our company sponsors a group health plan for its employees. What are the consequences if we fail to comply with COBRA?

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