Stay Interviews: A Valuable Retention Tool

Most managers are familiar with exit interviews – a series of questions asked of employees who are terminating their employment with the company. The purpose of the exit interview is to gather information about the employee’s opinions of their employment with the company – how did the employee feel about training, management, their pay and benefits, what types of obstacles or challenges did the e1438752_91149422mployee face, why is the employee leaving employment with the company, etc. This information can then be considered when deciding whether to make any changes at the company for the remaining and future employees.

While very useful information can be obtained from exit interviews, they are done too late. By the time an employee is completing an exit interview it is too late for the employer to make changes for that employee. Instead of exit interviews (or in addition to) employers may want to consider doing “stay” interviews with their existing employees. Find out how the employee feels about their position, their pay and benefits, their supervisors. Learn about what challenges employees are facing. Ask for suggestions to improve the workplace. Get a better idea of what is working and what employees do enjoy about working there. What keeps the employees coming to work for you every day?  Continue reading

When Can You Deduct from an Exempt Employee’s Pay?

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires that all employees be paid at least minimum wage for all hours worked as well as pay of at least one and one half times their regular rate of pay for all overtime hours worked over 40 hours in a workweOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAek. Employees who are classified as exempt are not subject to these minimum wage or overtime requirements.

In order to be classified as exempt, the employee must be paid on a salary basis of at least $455 per week. In addition, the employee’s work must meet certain duties tests as established by the Department of Labor (DOL). You can read more about this here.

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Yes, That’s an At Will Employee – But Documentation is Still Important!

In all states but Montana, employees are generally considered to be have “at will” employment meaning that either party (the employee or the employer) can terminate the employment relationship at any time, with or without notice, and for any reason or no reason at all (outside of reasons prohibited by law).  Most employers have established policies to create the at will employment as it is beneficial both to the business and the employees. In other cases employers create employment contracts with employees which generally specifically address reasons for termination and how a termination should be handled.  Continue reading

Should We Be Paying Our Interns?

The Department of Labor (DOL) has recently released a statement adopting a “primary beneficiary” test to be used when determining whether an intern for a for-profit employer should be classified as an employee under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  Continue reading

Five Employer Overtime Myths Debunked

The Federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires that employers pay all non-exempt employees at a rate of at least one and one half times their regular rate of pay for each hour worked over 40 hours in a workweek.  While this may seem straight forward, there are many misconceptions regarding when overtime is to be paid and to which employees.  Below is a list of five of the top myths associated with overtime pay.  Continue reading

Verifying I-9 Documents for Remote Workers

All employers are required to verify employment eligibility of their new employees by completing Form I-9. Section 2 of the form is to be completed by a representative of the company within three business days of the employee’s first day of work. To complete Section 2, the employer’s representative must physically review original documents which verify employment eligibility (acceptable documents include a passport, permanent resident card, driver’s license, birth certificate and many others as indicated on the instructions of Form I-9). These documents must be originals and cannot be copies, scanned versions, faxes and also cannot be viewed over a video call such as Skype. This creates a potential issue for companies with a remote workforce where employees do not all live and work in the same area. Continue reading

California: New Employment Laws in 2018

Beginning on January 1, 2018 there are a number of new employment laws going into effect in California that employers should be aware of.  Read below for details regarding five of these new laws.  Continue reading